Tag Archives: financial capital

Ever-Improving Competitive Advantage: Hitting the 5 Dimensions

Mario Andretti Watkins Glen 1974A firm exists in competitive environments along several key dimensions. Each dimension (or metaphorically, a competitive marketplace) has its own set of competitors acting in their own self-interests. In each dimension, the players compete for scarce resources (customers, marketshare, industry profit share, people, investments, etc.). A firm improves by increasing its competitive advantage along each dimension. These 5 key dimensions are:

  1. Customers
  2. Financial capital
  3. Talent
  4. Extended value chain or value network
  5. Community

A modern approach to improvement:

  • Covers all dimensions simultaneously.
  • Is integrated, holistic, sustainable, high impact, and a whole slurry of other buzzwords
  • Allows improvement ideas from everyone within a firm to fit somewhere, which draws in full participation (“Full Force Improvement”)
  • Has a goal to enable a firm to constantly ever increase its competitive advantage (as in any Olympic athlete who continually strives for better performance)

To gain ever-increasing advantages, a firm must be, or must be perceived to be, more attractive than the competition.

  • Customers
    • This is what people usually think of when they hear competitive market.
    • A firm competes with other firms in the same industries.
    • More attractive offerings (products, services, innovation)
    • More attractive value proposition (benefits versus cost)
    • More attractive long term relationship
  • Financial capital
    • Here the firm competes for limited investment dollars from investors and creditors
    • Competitors include those seeking any number of investment alternatives for investors: stocks, bonds, commercial paper, cash, etc.
    • Gain advantage by providing more attractive financial returns than alternative investment vehicles available
    • Being more attractive in the stock market drives up stock price
    • Being more attractive in the credit market increases access to capital and lowers the cost of capital
  • Talent
    • The competitors are other employers that require the same skills, experience, and knowledge that a firm requires.
    • The other employers can be from similar, adjacent, or different industries.
    • Competitive advantage includes providing a more attractive work environment, richer total compensation (salary, benefits, wealth creation), and other elements that make a firm a “great place to work”
    • For example, firms like NetApp (Fortune’s 2009 “Best Place to Work”) have an advantage in attracting the best talent.
  • Extended value chain or value network
    • The extended value network includes business partners on both the supply side and the demand side: suppliers, service providers, channel partners, and so on.
    • Good partners are in short supply and a firm gains advantage by being a more attractive partner than other players in the market.
    • Example, Dell is one of the leading channel partners for hard disk drives. Drive manufacturers constantly compete to have their drives picked for the next PC that Dell assembles.
  • Community
    • A firm can gain competitive advantage over others by demonstrating stellar corporate social responsibility.
    • Communities desire firms with a strong sense of CSR.
    • Firms can realize significant tax benefits from state and local governments.
    • CSR also impacts other dimensions such as talent (the feel good factor).

An effective and sustainable improvement approach must be directed towards continually gaining competitive advantage along the 5 key dimensions. A firm can never rest nor ignore others in its ecosystem. The firm must marshall its employees and those in its extended value network to execute strategies for Full Force Improvement.